Intense pulsed light

The intense pulsed light treatments became the darlings of beauty magazines and fell in the taste of the population. No wonder, besides an affordable price, the pulsed light It's a non-evasive way to take care of skin problems, safe, fast and almost pain free. Want to know more?

How does intense pulsed light act?

It consists of the application of gentle pulses of light on the skin, allowing to correct various lesions on both the face and body. This type of treatment is ideal for eliminating and / or smoothing out fine wrinkles, facial, hand, back and neck aging, correcting very thin facial vessels, rosacea, age spots, sun damage, skin texture changes, dark circles and blemishes. varied.


How is the application of intense pulsed light?

Firstly, the eyes of patients and the doctor applying the application need to be protected from light. Then an ice gel is applied over the region to be treated and the applicator crystal is approached from the skin.

At the pulsed light fixture, there is a crystal-coupled cooler that, when turned on, emits high light pulses. With each pulse, do you feel a slight? Pinch? on the skin, which is very quiet and lighter than the sensation of hot waxing, for example.

For those with the most sensitive skin, there is an anesthetic cream that can be applied, but it is rare for anyone to need it. After application, a slight redness may appear, which disappears almost on the same day. Finally, the doctor uses a moisturizer with sunscreen.


Also suitable for hair removal?

Yes the pulsed light It is a method that has fallen into the favor of women mainly by removing the hair permanently. The light pulses on the skin They are absorbed and converted into heat by the melanin present in the hair, progressively weakening the hair follicles, which inhibits hair growth.

It takes four to eight sessions to finish them off permanently. This treatment can also be used by men, anywhere on the body, including the beard.

It is important to remember that while you are doing the sessions you are not allowed to use hair removal methods that take root hair and all (wax and electric epilators, for example). This is because the effectiveness of pulsed light is compromised since it will not find the root of the hair.


What's the difference in having pulsed light and laser hair removal?

THE pulsed light hair removal It covers a larger area than laser treatment, but laser treatment usually requires fewer sessions (three to six). But laser hair removal sessions are more expensive.

Is it true that black skin does not benefit from pulsed light hair removal?

Exactly. As black skin has more melanin, it ends up with a greater light absorption capacity, so pulsed light treatment may cause skin damage such as burns, blisters and discoloration. But there are exceptions, so it's worth talking to your dermatologist first.

Pulsed light and photoaging treatments

Do you realize the photoaging in areas most exposed to the sun, such as face, lap, arms and neck, which have darker spots. THE pulsed light It acts on these blemishes, eliminating darker and reddish pigments, which makes the skin more rejuvenated.

What are the necessary precautions after application?

After applying, you need to use sunscreen and can return to your activities immediately. The length of a session is 20 to 40 minutes.

The most important recommendation is to avoid the sun for two to three weeks after application, which is why making this treatment in winter is easier as you will not go to pools and the beach in the cold.

It is also necessary to be 24 hours without physical activity after application. This care is necessary to avoid excessive heat in the region that received the pulsed lightonce it is already hot.

As popular as it has become, don't risk taking this treatment in untrustworthy places, as you can get your skin blemished. Talk to your dermatologist first, if he does not have this treatment, he will be able to tell you a safe place to take care of your skin, ok?

New Intense Pulsed Light Therapy for Chronic Dry Eye - Mayo Clinic (April 2021)


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